Tuesday, August 8, 2017

Ode to the Buffalo Bull



 
Bison are the most reliable beasts in Yellowstone. Nearly 5,000 in number, they are commonly seen from the valleys and overlooks, by the rivers and by the roads. They scratch their great heads upon trees to deal with insect pests, rub off the bark, and leave scars across the forest, which everyone misattributes to bears or elk. On a misty morning in August, the bellows of the bulls echo across the plains like a rumbling volcano. As the mist rolls away in the rising sun, the battlefield is revealed. Hundreds of bison in the valley below. A bull trots beside a cow, sniffs her rear end, waits for her to come into heat, roars across the plains, telling other bulls that this one is MINE. His hold lasts only as long as he can keep other bulls away, by intimidation or by force. The cows swear fealty to no partner. Their criteria is simple: the best fighters are the most attractive. He who dominates others of his kind will sire many children whom he will not know. For the life of the bull bison is solitary, walking with the herd when convenient, walking alone when convenient, eating grass all day, tolerating others of his kind when sharing the meadow. In the prime of health, he has little to fear. At 2,000 pounds, with a battering ram for a forehead, swords in his horns, and knives in his hooves—grizzly bears and wolves keep their distance and search for easier prey. The bull eats and walks and stays out of trouble, until the next mating season. Then the fury of testosterone consumes him again. All of his weapons are at the ready, but his opponents are equally armed. Corpses litter the field at mating season’s end, the result of those fights in which both adversaries refused to back down. And this attracts beasts that are normally harder to see. Grizzly bears appear on the field, thankful for the scavenged feast, in time to prepare for winter hibernation.

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Returned to Yellowstone, Surrounded by Wonders Large and Small

 I wrote this entry on May 19, 2017. Revisited and finally posted it now.




I’m back at Yellowstone. My first work day will be Sunday. My parents have come to visit the park and me before the work season starts. Today, the wildlife was out in abundance. In the valley by the Yellowstone River, the bison calves chased each other and frolicked, then trotted behind their mothers as they ambled through the pasture, munching along the way.

 

 

My mom (the wise botanist Susan Moyle Studlar) and I leaped from the car at stop after stop, and clicked away with our digital cameras. For most of the trip, my dad (Donley Studlar, political scientist of the world) drove, and took the opportunity to tilt back the driver’s seat and rest at most of the stops. Along the Lamar River, an osprey chick poked its fuzzy head out from the nest like a little periscope and peeped hungrily as it saw its mother soaring home, with fish in talons. By the bridge over the Yellowstone River near Tower Falls, a black bear sow and two cubs chomped on grass, ambled down the hill and hopped across the water. Their black forms disappeared and reappeared among the sage.

 
 

On green slopes in the Lamar Valley, with snowy mountains in the background, eight bighorn rams sat and rested, while a red fox trotted up and down and around in the foliage, listening and sniffing and periodically looking back over its shoulder. Farther down the road, we walked into the valley and saw pronghorns graze in the distance to the north. To our west, a coyote ran in a wide arc around a resting bull bison, perhaps cautious not to disturb the aggressive herbivore while hunting for ground squirrels. In a mucky place on the other side of the road, six mountain bluebirds alternately hovered and landed on the ground or on the sage. Remarkably, various wildlife photographers honed their telephoto lenses on the little beauties.

 
For the bears and the buffalo, the osprey and the bighorn sheep, the tourists pulled off the road in every which direction, and pointed spotting scopes and mobile phones. A young woman from China took repeated selfies with the rams in the background, as if the bighorns were insufficient as primary focus. Across the park, the animals carried on their wild behavior undisturbed, as the humans kept a healthy distance. Late in the day, I finally met two grizzly bears out together somewhere on the road between Mammoth Hot Springs and Norris Geyser Basin, and some Asian tourists approached the beasts at far too close a range, within ten feet. An international chorus of voices from other visitors called for them to back up.



By a pond in Lamar, with binoculars and field guide, my mom and I worked together with two Frenchmen in black puffy coats to identify the ducks. There was a ruddy duck afloat, and a goldeneye diving and resurfacing. There were the familiar mallards, and the less-familiar harlequins. Guided by the wise botanist, we took special note of life forms that all the other travelers around us ignored—such as the monkey flowers and Eriogonum flowers and moss growing in the stark environment of Biscuit Basin, and the lichens growing upon a glacial erratic boulder in Lamar Valley. Although wolves and bears are worthy of all the attention that is lavished upon them, so many wonderful forms of life are not given their due. I hope that my fellow travelers can learn to stop and look at and smell the earth and witness the moss and small birds, in between waiting for an eruption of Old Faithful or driving up and down Lamar Valley in hopes of glimpsing a wolf’s ear behind a stump.














Back at the visitor centers and government housing areas, I met some familiar Homo sapiens. Many of my old comrades from past seasons of ranger work were back. I received hugs from Rosa and Dana, shook the hands of Michael and Corey and Mike. It’s seems like the months of November through April have faded into oblivion, and work and life in the Yellowstone community has returned, after a week’s hiatus. It is good to be back. And the return is made all the sweeter by the chaos of the winter months. On November 9, 2016, I thought that I might not live to see this day, that the newly-elected president might have started a global nuclear war by now. That is still a very real possibility and I remain concerned. But for now, I revere and revel in the wonders of the Yellowstone.




Touring (and blogging) as Civilian Ross, I had to maintain the ethics imparted on park visitors by my alter ego, Ranger Ross. Hence, I’ll note that my point-and-shoot cameras have surprisingly good zoom lenses. And the very close-range wildlife photos were taken from out of the car’s windows!

Photos #11-15 and #17 (of Black Pearl Spring with moss, lichen-covered boulder [broad view and close-up], Eriogonum, and Ross at Storm Point) by © Susan Moyle Studlar. All other photos by © Ross Wood Studlar.


Due to limited internet access and other demands on my schedule, it may be two months before my next blog post.

Tuesday, May 30, 2017

Life in Plastic



Staggering volumes of plastic garbage infect the oceans. The images of sperm whales, sea turtles, and albatross with their innards full of ingested plastic are the stuff of nightmares. A recent report from The Guardian brings new haunting visions. Henderson Island—an uninhabited island in the South Pacific—has the highest density of anthropogenic debris found anywhere in the world, being buried under 38 million pieces of plastic debris, weighing in at 18 metric tons. Hermit crabs on the island use bottle caps and cosmetic jars for shells, and one reportedly was seen using in a doll’s head. I’m impressed by the crustacean’s adaptability, but horrified by the world we are forcing them to adapt to.

Plastic is an indestructible material that we use once and then dispose of. But there is no “away;” the toxic miracle material must go somewhere; and all too often its destination is the ocean. Plastic can kill quickly, such as to the turtle that chokes on a balloon; or slowly, by giving people cancer or sterility.

And yet, it’s damn hard to stop using so much plastic. I avoid bottled water and straws, and bring reusable cloth bags to the grocery store. Still, almost every product comes in a plastic container. (That glossy cardboard? It’s coated in plastic!) I’m still searching for ways to de-plastify. Some suggestions can be found here. Marine plastic is a crisis on the same level as global climate change, and requires a similar all-hands-on-deck response.

Highly recommended: A Plastic Ocean, documentary film directed by Craig Leeson, 2017.

Also check out Greenpeace's Story of a Spoon.


Saturday, May 6, 2017

Bud, Lord of the Manor



Bud has risen from his long winter’s sleep, and has just had a bath (which is really a long drink, because he drinks through his skin). I caught the venerable Pacman frog on camera after he had hopped onto solid earth again, and before he found a nice spot, and dug himself partway underground, to rest with head poking up from the mud. Apparently, it was exhausting work for Bud, digging himself out of the deeper burrow where he had hibernated for winter. With this task complete, he spends most of the time sleeping or resting. I want to give Bud an earthworm, but I’m still waiting to see Bud with eyes wide open; the sign of hunger. (Or hopping around the terrarium and attacking the glass, the sign of famishment.) It has been many months since he last ate, but the cold-blooded beast plays by a different set of rules than us hyperactive warmbloods. Without meditation or yoga, Bud is naturally at peace. Until hunger rumbles or thirst drives him back to the pool.

Every year, Bud takes a long sleep in a burrow by winter, and rises for spring. His human caretakers have trouble comprehending the different pace by which the amphibian lives. For one reason or another, we have suspected him dead year after year, then are surprised when he reappears, alive and healthy. This year, when warm weather didn’t awaken him, and a bumpy ride from West Virginia to North Carolina didn’t awaken him, we wondered if Bud would not awaken. Then we spotted him in hibernation, having made a burrow near to the glass wall of the terrarium. This gave us a window into Bud’s world, one we had never had before in so many years. The amphibian slept inside a sort of bubble carved out of the soil, and slowly breathed the fresh air. The earth gave insulation, to make a comfortable environment for an exothermic animal. He shifted positions periodically, and sometimes awakened for a little while. Now we know how he avoids bedsores.




 
I acquired Bud when I was a teenager, and the amphibian has led an astonishingly long life for his species of more than 20 years, and there’s no telling how long he will live. After I moved away from home, my Mom, the wise botanist Susan Moyle Studlar, has cared for the creature. Hence, Bud is Lord of the Manor, commanding some able servants. It seems that Bud has taken well to the move from West Virginia to North Carolina, and is getting some healthy sunlight as he looks out the south-facing window beyond his terrarium. The new Studlar family home in North Carolina is a little closer to Bud’s ancestral home of South America. His wild cousins live in the rainforest and prey upon insects, lizards, small mammals, other frogs, and anything that will fit down their gullet! Perhaps the scene that Bud surveys in the photo recalls ancestral memories of the rainforest. Then again, the aged amphibian’s eyesight has declined a bit…. I hope he at least sees some nice splotches of green against the sunlight.

Bud hibernating photo by © Susan Moyle Studlar. Bud belongs to the species Ceratophrys ornata.

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

From out of the basement, the Bogosaurus awakens!

I made this papier-mâché sculpture when I was 16; ’twas a project for a high school art class. Now I have reunited with the beast, after it had long been dormant in my parents’ basement. At the time I laid down the flour-soaked strips of newspaper, I referred to the sculpted alien as simply “my creature.” Evidently, I am long overdue to give this creature a name and a story. I am working on that now. Tentatively calling it a Bogosaurus; and it’s first issue is forthcoming!


When the whole Studlar family moved out of our old home in West Virginia, I thought that could not keep the sculpture. It’s combination of length and height made it wholly impractical to transport by way of our rental vans, which were already overloaded with stuff. In the final move-out, I had played an insane and exhausting game of “Tetris” in the vehicles. I filled suitcases with books, nested containers in containers like Russian dolls, stuffed all empty spaces with soft things like clothes, put items like staplers and surge protectors under the seats, and arranged and rotated every piece of the puzzle in an effort to use every millimeter of available space. It was around midnight and the snow was falling outside. Weary from the protracted effort and with sore forearms from all the stuffing, I took my final photos of the creature under the basement’s fluorescent lights, thinking it would then join the trash pile, with the moldy clothes hamper and the cans of solidified paint. It seemed an undignified ending to such a memorable creation. But my dad proclaimed that we could keep the creature. I declared that impossible. He suggested putting it atop the load; I objected because that would prevent the driver from seeing out the back. He suggested the car-top carrier; and I noted that it was already full of stuff. Then I had a flash of insight. Or maybe a solution this obvious is not worthy of being called insight. I got out my pocket-knife and cut the creature’s tail off. The long tail we put on top of the load in the back of the van. The body we placed in the front-seat, where there was just enough room, amidst the driver’s overnight back and snack food and CDs. Upon arrival to our new home in Asheville, North Carolina, I taped the beast back together. It now stands proud atop the mantle. I am working on inventing its science-fictional biology.

Bogosaurus sculpture  ©Ross Wood Studlar. Photo ©Susan Moyle Studlar.

Saturday, March 18, 2017

See you in SPACE






I will be exhibiting and selling my comics work at SPACE (Small Press & Alternative Comics Expo) in Columbus, Ohio, March 25-26! Debuting at this show, GUERILLA FOOTBALL: A QUEST BY A CYBORG HORSE TO MAKE HIMSELF WHOLE—a 44-page one-shot science fiction comic book, wherein a transhuman cybernetic horse and orang-utan team up to steal a priceless historic football in hopes of selling it to raise funds to buy themselves human bodies. Their quest is fraught with peril; opponents include the cybernetic football player of the future! I will also be selling just about every other comic book I’ve made or contributed to in the past 14 years, including FROG STORIES, AWESOME ‘POSSUM 2 & 3, etc.
http://www.backporchcomics.com/space.htm